(408) 356-6893

Palo Alto Property Management

We Can Help Manage Your Palo Alto Rental Property

We offer a full range of property management services tailored to you as an investor, homeowner, or landlord. We have an extensive portfolio with over 300 single family homes, townhouses, condos, and apartments in the Palo Alto area. "Full-Service" means we specialize in preparation, marketing, administration, and tenant retention.



What we do as your property manager:


  • Evaluate the Property and Determine a Rental Rate
  • Market the Property
  • Tenant Application
  • Move In
  • Rent collection
  • Annual and Safety Inspections
  • Accounting Services
  • Maintenance, and Upkeep
  • Move Out


Evaluate the Property and Determine a Rental Rate

  • Meet at the property, discuss goals, plans, etc. for the property and provide a possible rental rate
  • Offer recommendations on repairs and cosmetic improvements that maximize potential monthly rent while providing a good ROI
  • Discuss with owners the pros and cons of different policies such as accepting pets, etc.
  • Install a lock box


Market the Property

  • Prepare home for rent
    • Clean home
    • Make sure the property is safe and maintained
  • Create ads tailored to the property and advertising in 50+ locations:
    • Paid and free rental listing websites
    • Print publications
    • Signs
    • Flyers and e-flyers
    • Advertise and work with local realtors
  • Partnered with Google, Apple, Ebay, etc. to insure access to high quality tenants
  • Meet prospective tenants for showings 7 days a week.
  • Provide prospective tenants with rental applications that are legally compliant with fair housing laws

Inquire About Our Services




Tenant Application Process



Move In



Rent collection



Annual and Safety Inspections



Accounting Services



Maintenance, and Upkeep



Move Out



Testimonials



Frequently Asked Questions



Palo Alto Area Information


Palo Alto's earliest recorded history dates from 1769, when Gaspar de Portolà noted an Ohlone settlement. This remains an area of known Indian mounds. A plaque at Middlefield Road and Embarcadero Road commemorates the area.

The city got its name from the tall landmark Redwood tree, El Palo Alto, which still grows on the east bank of San Francisquito Creek across from Menlo Park. One trunk of the twin-trunked tree can still be found by the railroad trestle near Alma Street in El Palo Alto Park (the other trunk was destroyed during a storm in the late 20th century). There a plaque recounts the story of the Portolà expedition, a 63-man, 200-horse expedition from San Diego to Monterey from November 7–11, 1769. The group overshot Monterey in the fog and when they reached modern-day Pacifica, they ascended Sweeney Ridge and discovered San Francisco Bay. Portolà descended from Sweeney Ridge southeast down San Andreas Creek to Laguna Creek (now Crystal Springs Reservoirs and the Filoli estate, and thence to the San Francisquito Creek watershed, ultimately camping at El Palo Alto from November 6–11, 1769. Thinking the bay was too wide to cross, the group retraced their journey back to Monterey, never discovering the Golden Gate entrance to the Bay.

About 1827, Rafael Soto, the tenth child and a son of De Anza Expedition settler Ygnacio Soto and María Bárbara Espinosa de Lugo of Alta, California, came to stay with Máximo Martínez at his Rancho Corte de Madera for seven years. Located south of the San Francisquito Creek, west of today's I-280, Rancho Corte de Madera covered most of Portola Valley to Skyline Boulevard extending south to about Foothill College. In 1835, Rafael Soto and family settled near the San Francisquito Creek near Newell and Middlefield, selling goods to travelers. Rafael Soto died in 1839, but his wife, Maria Antonia Mesa, was granted Rancho Rinconada del Arroyo de San Francisquito in 1841.

Their daughter María Luisa Soto married in 1839, John Coppinger, who was the grantee of Rancho Cañada de Raymundo. Rancho Cañada de Raymundo was West of San Francisquito Creek, and began at Alambique Creek, the north border of Rancho Corte de Madera, and extended north, including present day Woodside. Bear Gulch Creek (Bear Creek) flowed on his land in Portola Valley. The rancho also abutted Buelna's grant near Skyline Boulevard and Matadero Creek. Upon Coppinger's death, Maria inherited it and later married a visiting boat captain, John Greer. Greer owned a home on the property that is now Town & Country Village on Embarcadero and El Camino Real. Greer Avenue and Court are named for him. To the west of Rafael Soto, near El Camino and following the Creek, was Rancho San Francisquito granted in 1839, to Antonio Buelna and wife Maria Concepcion.
Source: Wikipedia



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Contact Us

DWM Properties
15760 Los Gatos Blvd.
Los Gatos CA 95032
Info@dwmproperties.com
CA BRE License #:00888262

Phone:(408) 356-6893
Fax:(408) 356-6899


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